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Mar 25, 2017
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Counseling Center: NCAA Eligibility

separating rule

All prospective student-athletes intending to enroll in an NCAA Division I or II institution for the first time must complete the NCAA Amateurism Certification questionnaire located on the NCAA Clearinghouse website. [NCAA Eligibility Center Online]

 

Important information for all college-bound athletes:

View the 2014-15 video on Understanding the NCAA Process HERE (requires Google Chrome).

To learn more about the NCAA Eligibility Process, watch the video HERE.

IMPORTANT: There are new rules to determine the NCAA Eligibility of students entering Division I colleges on or after August 1, 2016. All student-athletes in the Class of 2016 and beyond should be aware of these and plan ahead to keep their college options open as they go through high school. See New NCAA Division 1 Eligibility Requirements. [PDF]

 

Supply ACT or SAT Scores Directly to the NCAA Clearinghouse

Attention high school graduates: The NCAA has legislation in place that requires prospects who intend to enroll at NCAA Division I and Division II institutions to supply ACT or SAT scores to the Clearinghouse directly from the testing agencies. Test scores on an official high school transcript are no longer accepted for NCAA purposes. Please have your ACT/SAT scores sent directly from the testing agency to the NCAA Clearinghouse. To do this: Complete the ACT/SAT registration form, and include the Clearinghouse code: 9999 or contact the testing agency directly.

 

NCAA - National Collegiate Athletic Association

NCAA Purpose: To govern competition in a fair, safe, equitable and sportsmanlike manner, and to integrate intercollegiate athletics into higher education so that the educational experience of the student-athlete is paramount.

 

NCAA Sports Sponsorship

List of NCAA schools and conferences by Sport (can also be sorted by state).

 

NCAA Members By Division

List of NCAA schools and conferences by Division (can also be sorted by state).

 

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DIVISION I, II and III?

Division I:

Division I member institutions have to sponsor at least seven sports for men and seven for women (or six for men and eight for women) with two team sports for each gender. Each playing season has to be represented by each gender as well. There are contest and participant minimums for each sport, as well as scheduling criteria. For sports other than football and basketball, Division I schools must play 100 percent of the minimum number of contests against Division I opponents -- anything over the minimum number of games has to be 50 percent Division I. Men's and women's basketball teams have to play all but two games against Division I teams; for men, they must play one-third of all their contests in the home arena. Schools that have football are classified as Division I-A or I-AA. I-A football schools are usually fairly elaborate programs. Division I-A teams have to meet minimum attendance requirements (average 15,000 people in actual or paid attendance per home game), which must be met once in a rolling two-year period. Division I-AA teams do not need to meet minimum attendance requirements. Division I schools must meet minimum financial aid awards for their athletics program, and there are maximum financial aid awards for each sport that a Division I school cannot exceed.

 

Division II

Division II institutions have to sponsor at least five sports for men and five for women, (or four for men and six for women), with two team sports for each gender, and each playing season represented by each gender. There are contest and participant minimums for each sport, as well as scheduling criteria -- football and men's and women's basketball teams must play at least 50% of their games against Div. II or I-A or I-AA opponents. For sports other than football and basketball there are no scheduling requirements. There are not attendance requirements for football, or arena game requirements for basketball. There are maximum financial aid awards for each sport that a Div. II school must not exceed. Division II teams usually feature a number of local or in-state student-athletes. Many Division II student-athletes pay for school through a combination of scholarship money, grants, student loans and employment earnings. Division II athletics programs are financed in the institution's budget like other academic departments on campus. Traditional rivalries with regional institutions dominate schedules of many Division II athletics programs.

 

Division III

Division III institutions have to sponsor at least five sports for men and five for women, with two team sports for each gender, and each playing season represented by each gender. There are minimum contest and participant minimums for each sport. Division III athletics features student-athletes who receive no financial aid related to their athletic ability and athletic departments are staffed and funded like any other department in the university. Division III athletics departments place special importance on the impact of athletics on the participants rather than on the spectators. The student-athlete's experience is of paramount concern. Division III athletics encourages participation by maximizing the number and variety of athletics opportunities available to students, placing primary emphasis on regional in-season and conference competition.

If you are planning to enroll in a Division I or a Division II college and wish to participate in sports there, you must be certified by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse.